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Mouse In The House? Common Household Pests & How To Deal With Them.

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Mouse In The House? Common Household Pests & How To Deal With Them.

Australia has one of the most diverse ecosystems in the entire world. The continent’s natural isolation, along with its widely varying climates, has lead to the evolution of a variety of unique species.

These animals help to give Australia its natural charm, and are a treasure that should be protected and cherished… unless, of course, they’re of the variety that take over and infest your home.

Once they cross that threshold, they instantly become pests. After all, a funnel web spider may seem like an intriguing animal from a distance, but becomes much less so when it decides to make a home for itself underneath your bed.

That example may be extreme and unlikely, however – the following pests are a bit more common.

Here are three familiar Australian house pests, and what you should do if they find their way into your home.

1. Rodents

Rodents are some of the most prolific and adaptable mammalian species on the planet. The good news is that of Australia’s native species of rodent, very few are actually considered pests.

The bad news is that several foreign species of rodent have been introduced to Australia over the years, and these could potentially cause you some serious problems. Rodents have been known to carry disease, and can cause damage to your home by chewing through walls and electrical wires.

Secure your home against a rodent infestation by blocking any outside access points, such as holes, cracks, or doors/windows that don’t shut properly.

Also, because they are small and naturally timid creatures, rodents are often able to gain a stable foothold in a home before they are ever even noticed by its human occupants, which makes it all the more difficult to remove them once they are discovered.

Secure your home against a rodent infestation by blocking any outside access points, such as holes, cracks, or doors/windows that don’t shut properly.

Also, keep any food in your home (including pet food) secure in sealed containers.

Regularly clean your home, and ensure you sweep up food crumbs from off of the floor, and don’t let rubbish pile up. If you do begin to notice signs of a rodent infestation (droppings, gnaw marks on walls or furniture, holes in food packaging, etc.), your best bet is to contact a professional pest control company.

Of course, if you prefer, you can also attempt to take care of the problem yourself, but be warned: poisons can potentially harm pets and family members, as well as rodents.

2. Insects

There are too many different pest species of insect to address them all, so for right now we’ll just focus on a few of the most common and most damaging.

Cockroaches are a big problem in many areas (thanks to Australia’s warm, dry climate), and—much like rodents—tend to keep out of sight during the day.

Also like rodents, they thrive on rubbish and unsecured food. Silverfish and carpet beetle larvae are also commonly found in homes, and tend to feed on paper, as well as the human hair and dead skin cells in unclean carpets.

In each of these cases, keeping a clean and tidy home is the best defense against infestation. You can also use deterrent sprays and powders around the perimeter of your house, paying special attention to possible access points.

Be sure to exercise caution whenever chemicals are used in the home.

If, however, things have already gotten out of hand, you should immediately isolate the infected area, thoroughly clean it to get rid of any eggs, and then use a contact pesticide to deal with any remaining pests.

Again, be sure to exercise caution whenever chemicals are used in the home. If the infestation persists, contact a professional.

3. Snakes

Australia has more than its fair share of dangerous snakes. There are approximately 50 venomous snakes in the land down under, including the Eastern Brown Snake (which accounts for approximately 80% of all Australian snake bites) and the Inland Taipan (which happens to be the most venomous snake in the world).

Other notable snakes include a specimen called the Australian Death Adder.

So it’s probably a safe bet that a snake in your home could be a major cause for concern.

If you happen to find that a snake has made its way into your home, you should never touch it

As such, if you happen to find that a snake has made its way into your home, you should never touch it. Treat the snake as though it is venomous, even if you’re fairly sure it isn’t—it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Keep your distance, and close any internal doors to other rooms. Open the home’s external doors, and give the snake a chance to leave on its own. Don’t do anything to threaten or scare it, as snakes can strike incredibly fast.

Most snakebites occur when an inexperienced person attempts to touch or move the snake, so if the snake doesn’t seem interested in going outside, call your local snake removal service.

Remember, wild snakes are protected in Australia, so don’t attempt to harm or kill the animal unless you have absolutely no other choice.

 

http://www.domyownpestcontrol.com/how-to-get-rid-of-australian-roaches-a-207.html
http://www.acera.unimelb.edu.au/materials/brochures/SDM-AustraliasPestAnimals.pdf
http://www.slv.vic.gov.au/explore/conservation-guides/dealing-pests
http://www.esrc.unimelb.edu.au/