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Roadside Good Samaritan: Grey Haired Rural Dad

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Roadside Good Samaritan: Grey Haired Rural Dad

When was the last time you changed a tyre on a car? Or jump-started a flat battery?

If you’re like almost half of Australians, the answers to those two questions would be: Never. According to a survey by Budget Direct Roadside Assistance 45% of Australians aren’t comfortable changing a tyre and 47% wouldn’t attempt to jump-start a car.

Perhaps not surprisingly, males are far more confident about car maintenance compared to females. An overwhelming majority of men (81%) can change a tyre (compared to 30% of women), and 75% of men are comfortable jump-starting a car, compared to 32% of women.

According to a survey by Budget Direct Roadside Assistance 45% of Australians aren’t comfortable changing a tyre and 47% wouldn’t attempt to jump-start a car.

I can certainly relate; as a Gen X female I’ve had a few lessons on how to change a tyre, but have never attempted to do so in a real life situation.

I wouldn’t even know how to assemble the jack. I’m getting by on the belief that a flat tyre will never happen to me – and if it does I’d do like 7 out of 10 urban Australians in the survey and phone Roadside Assistance.

I might consider leaving the bonnet up – the universal sign of roadside distress – but if I’m in the city I could be in for a long wait. According to the survey, only 53% of urban dwellers would stop and help, compared to 62% of country folk.

The research also found older motorists are also more likely to be Roadside Good Samaritans than younger ones, with 61% of drivers aged 50+ saying they would stop and lend a hand, compared to 43% of Generation Y (20-34).

Does this mean younger drivers are less caring or less capable? Certainly cars today are more complex than ever before, and most people struggle just to get the GPS functioning properly.

According to the survey, only 53% of urban dwellers would stop and help, compared to 62% of country folk.

Singletons seem the most selfish drivers of all, as the survey found couples (60%), single parents (60%) and parents with children (55%) were more likely to stop than singles without kids (49%).

So if you’re stranded by the roadside this winter with a flat battery, your best bet while waiting for Roadside Assistance might just be to flag down a grey-haired rural dad.

And while he’s there, ask him to check your oil as well.

 

Sources
McCrindle Research Survey conducted 2014 on behalf of Budget Direct. 1072 respondents aged 18 and over participated from all states and territories.